Muhammad Ali, Frazier & Foreman all 3 Signed Autographed 20x17 Frame w/ 6x8 Photo w/coa $1100 Retail

Item code: RA-5481

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Starting Bid $329.00 Login to Bid / Buy
Bid History
Current Winning Bid $0.00 Time Left Auction started 26 Jul 2017 19:29:00 EST ends 19 Nov 2017 21:48:00 EST

Muhammad Ali, Frazier & Foreman all 3 Signed Autographed 20x17 Frame w/ 6x8 Photo w/coa $1100 Retail

Joe Frazier, George Foreman and Muhammad Ali together in 1994

The stated Original Hand Signed 20" x 17" Frame in the title will be the item you will receive. Inserted in the frame is a 6" x 8" photo of Muhammad Ali, George Foreman and Joe Frazier. Included are 3 authentic autographs of all 3 Hall of Fame boxers whom are some of the best of all time.

*The corners of the frame are protected by cardboard edges. Frame is almost new

Muhammad Ali was an American professional boxer and activist. He was widely regarded as one of the most significant and celebrated sports figures of the 20th century. Wikipedia
Height: 1.91 m
Spouse: Lonnie Ali (m. 1986–2016), more
Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.
He who is not courageous enough to take risks will accomplish nothing in life.

I hated every minute of training, but I said, 'Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.'

*There is very minor wear around the frame

George Edward Foreman is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1969 to 1977, and from 1987 to 1997. Nicknamed "Big George", he is a two-time world heavyweight champion and an Olympic gold medalist. Wikipedia
Born: January 10, 1949 (age 68), Marshall, Texas, United States
Height: 1.92 m
Reach: 78 12 in (199 cm)

George Edward Foreman (born January 10, 1949)[1] is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1969 to 1977, and from 1987 to 1997. Nicknamed "Big George", he is a two-time world heavyweight champion and an Olympic gold medalist. Outside the sport he is an ordained minister, author, and entrepreneur.

After a troubled childhood, Foreman took up amateur boxing and won a gold medal in the heavyweight division at the 1968 Summer Olympics. Having turned professional the next year, he won the world heavyweight title with a second-round knockout of then-undefeated Joe Frazier in 1973. Two successful title defenses were made before Foreman's first professional loss to Muhammad Ali in "The Rumble in the Jungle" in 1974. Unable to secure another title opportunity, Foreman retired after a loss to Jimmy Young in 1977.

Following what he referred to as a religious epiphany, Foreman became an ordained Christian minister. Ten years later he announced a comeback and, in 1994, at age 45, he regained a portion of the heavyweight championship by knocking out 27-year-old Michael Moorer to win the unified WBA, IBF, and lineal titles. Foreman remains the oldest world heavyweight champion in history, and the second oldest in any weight class after Bernard Hopkins (at light heavyweight). He retired in 1997 at the age of 48, with a final record of 76 wins (68 knockouts) and 5 losses.

Foreman has been inducted into the World Boxing Hall of Fame and the International Boxing Hall of Fame. The International Boxing Research Organization rates Foreman as the eighth greatest heavyweight of all time.[2] In 2002, he was named one of the 25 greatest fighters of the past 80 years by The Ring magazine.[3] The Ring ranked him as the ninth greatest puncher of all time.[4] He was a ringside analyst for HBO's boxing coverage for twelve years, leaving in 2004.[5] Outside of boxing, he is a successful entrepreneur and is known for his promotion of the George Foreman Grill, which has sold over 100 million units worldwide.[6] In 1999 he sold the naming rights to the grill for $138 million.[7]

Joseph William "Joe" Frazier, nicknamed "Smokin' Joe", was an American professional boxer who competed from 1965 to 1981. Wikipedia
Height: 1.82 m
Weight: 104 kg

Joseph William "Joe" Frazier (January 12, 1944 – November 7, 2011), nicknamed "Smokin' Joe", was an American professional boxer who competed from 1965 to 1981. He reigned as the undisputed heavyweight champion from 1970 to 1973, and as an amateur won a gold medal at the 1964 Summer Olympics. Frazier was known for his sheer strength, durability, formidable punching power, and relentless pressure fighting style.

Frazier emerged as the top contender in the late 1960s, defeating opponents that included Jerry Quarry, Oscar Bonavena, Buster Mathis, Eddie Machen, Doug Jones, George Chuvalo and Jimmy Ellis en route to becoming undisputed heavyweight champion in 1970, and followed up by defeating Muhammad Ali by unanimous decision in the highly anticipated Fight of the Century in 1971. Two years later Frazier lost his title when he was defeated by George Foreman. He fought on, beating Joe Bugner, losing a rematch to Ali and beating Quarry and Ellis again.

Frazier's last world title challenge came in 1975, but he was beaten by Ali in their brutal rubbermatch, the Thrilla in Manila. He retired in 1976 following a second loss to Foreman. He made a comeback in 1981, fighting just once, before retiring. The International Boxing Research Organization rates Frazier among the ten greatest heavyweights of all time.[2] In 1999, The Ring magazine ranked him the eighth greatest heavyweight.[3] He is an inductee of both the International Boxing Hall of Fame and the World Boxing Hall of Fame.

Frazier's style was often compared to that of Henry Armstrong and occasionally Rocky Marciano, dependent on bobbing, weaving and relentless pressure to wear down his opponents. His best known punch was a powerful left hook, which accounted for most of his knockouts. In his career he lost to only two fighters, both former Olympic and world heavyweight champions: twice to Muhammad Ali, and twice to George Foreman.

After retiring, Frazier made cameo appearances in several Hollywood movies, and two episodes of The Simpsons. His son Marvis became a boxer—trained by Frazier himself—but was unable to match his father's success. His daughter Jackie Frazier-Lyde also boxed professionally. Frazier continued to train fighters in his gym in Philadelphia. His later years saw periodic insults and bitter feelings towards Ali, interspersed with brief reconciliations.

Frazier was diagnosed with liver cancer in late September 2011 and admitted to hospice care.[4] He died of complications from the disease on November 7, 2011.[5]

We guarantee all our autographed items to be authentic and stand behind it with a 100% money back guarantee on the full amount of the item (Including any taxes or S+H) if it does not pass a PSA/DNA authentication.

We obtain all our autograph items from Collectors (Purchase of large Collections/Autograph Hunters), Other memorabilia companies, Large Wholesale Lots from eBay, Charity auctions and from time to time we do signings with celebrities. Sometimes the auto items come with COA's and sometimes they do not. We belong to a number of authentication verification companies i.e, Startiger.com. We check all autographs before we sell or list them to make sure they look like other authenticated autographs and confirmed originals from that particular person(s). We have been in the collectibles industry for many years and it is very important to us to sell original items, our reputation is everything. Please feel confident that our items are original.

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